A Guide to NZ Spring in 2020 for International Students

Thursday, August 27, 2020

While improving weather conditions and temperatures can be expected in springtime, this spring in New Zealand will be like no other due to the COVID-19 pandemic. With spring arriving in New Zealand next week, here is a helpful list of 10 things that you can do or expect.


Watch the flowers bloom
Spring is the season to see the flowers begin to bud and bloom all across New Zealand. This country has an abundance of beautiful flowers and natural wonders to take-in, with gardens, mountains, and fields all overflowing with flora to take-in. Keep an eye out for our colourful native plants, including the distinctive yellow-flowered Kōwhai (yellow) tree. When one of these trees flowers, it is said that spring has properly arrived, and according to Māori the tree is considered tapu (sacred).


When does spring ‘actually’ start?
While it is technically spring from the first day of September to the end of November, scientists say that the change to Spring weather will begin to be properly felt around Wednesday 23rd of September and end on Monday 21st of December. This is to do with the astronomical dates rather than the meteorological dates.


Daylight savings time
On Sunday 27th of September at 2am NZ’ers turn their clocks forward one hour at 2am to 3am so that the country can have longer days (an extra hour of daylight in the evening). During this period NZ is on ‘New Zealand daylight time’, one-hour ahead of ‘New Zealand standard time’. This ends at 3am on Sunday 4th April, when clocks are put back an hour to NZST.


Enjoy the warmer climate
Make the most of NZ’s ideal temperatures – it’s a happy medium after the freezing winter temperatures and before the summer when it gets almost too hot at times. Breathe in the scent of pollen and fresh grass that fills the air, embracing the sun as it casts its rays away from the winter cloud cover.


Harness the power of the wind!

In the spring the wind gets stronger, so we recommend windsurfing or blow karting. Even the windiest season can open opportunities to harness the power of the wind. It doesn’t always have to be a disruption.


Eat fresh fruit and vegetables

With so many fruits and vegetables in season, it’s a great time to be cooking up more healthy and hearty meals at home. In season fruit and vegetables include; kiwifruit (gold and green), lemons, oranges, strawberries, tangelos, asparagus, blueberries, broccoli, carrots, cauliflower, celery, courgettes, cucumber, eggplant, kale, kumara, leeks, lettuce, mushrooms, onions, parsnips, peas, potatoes, pumpkin, radishes, silverbeet, snow peas, spinach, swedes, tomatoes, watercress and yams.1


Travel the country

With winter and summer usually the busiest of months in New Zealand, and with COVID-19 currently affecting visitor numbers, all New Zealand’s places will be less crowded. Be safe, follow the social distancing rules and alert level guidelines, and enjoy the uncrowded joys of spring. There are so many places to see in New Zealand that will be transformed from cold wintry wonderlands into cool streams, green forests and flower-filled fields.


Take plenty of pictures

The colours in spring are fantastic for taking photos. New life begins as pink, purple, yellow, orange and white flowers dot the landscape, the grass gets greener and lambs are born on fields nationwide.


Spring ski

Less crowds, warmer weather, take advantage before the snow melts! Slushy snow and good times can be found when taking a trip to the mountains and ski areas just before they close for the season and the runs turn into mountain bike tracks for the summer.


Take a hike

Summer heat means that your hikes are cut short due to required stops in the shade, while in winter some areas are too treacherous to venture into. Spring provides a happy medium between the two, giving you a chance to experience some of NZ’s best walks and views without the extra temperature worries.

 

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iStudent Complaints is an independent dispute resolution scheme established by the New Zealand Government. Our objective is to encourage swift settlement of contractual and financial disputes between international students and their providers in New Zealand. As an independent and impartial service, we are not affiliated with any Education providers.

Why did we do this blog?
Even if we need to step in one day to help you resolve a dispute, we want you to enjoy studying and living in our amazing country as much as we do. To that end, we’ve created this content so that you may continue to explore and experience the best New Zealand can offer.